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Have Diabetes and Chronic Urinary Tract Infections

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  • Have Diabetes and Chronic Urinary Tract Infections




    Hello:

    My name is Jennifer and I am new here posting on the Davita forum.

    I am worried about my chronic urinary tract infections, some of which have been resistant to treatments in the past. I've had diabetes, (type 2), for about 12 years now and am being treated with Byetta injections, Metformin, and Actos. I also take Lotrel for hypertension which I have had since I was 12.

    I may be close to having ckd and my doc is watching for it. I wonder how many of you out there have had kidney disease from some of the same problems I've had? I know this is very common in diabetes, both type 1 and type 2's like myself.

    And when you don't have insurance, it is really scary. I know that I'll be heading to a nephrologist at some point or other, especially if these infections don't start going away again. I did call one neph in my area for the heck of it, and they say they won't take anyone without an insurance card! Can you believe that? It really frustrates me knowing I have these problems and that my regular doc, kind as he is, can only go so far with my problem here. There must be nephrologists that care enough to help those without insurance coverage.

    Sorry to go on and on, but I am awfully concerned here! If a person uninsured would have to go on dialysis, then what? Do they just not bother and let you go toxic if you have no insurance or anything??

    Jennifer

  • #2
    You need to contact your local financial assistance office to see if you qualify for any medical help (you may qualify even if you are working since you have diabetes). Another route would be to contact the kidney association. Once you are on dialysis, Medicare will pay. Be open with your dr. about your financial concerns, he/she may have some ideas as to how you can get some help.
    To the stars through difficulty!

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply!

      Hi!

      Glad someone finally replied to my post here. This really is a constant concern with me having so many urinary tract infections and then diabetes as well.

      Comment


      • #4
        I check this board at least once a day for new postings. I replied as soon as I saw your post. I hope I was helpful to you in some way. Please come back if you have other questions or just want to talk. This is a very supportive community.
        To the stars through difficulty!

        Comment


        • #5
          dear jennifer

          hello there!
          my name is tasha and i am somewhat new to this forum also. it is nice having a community of people to share your experiences with, i have found it very helpful just for general info. like you, i also have type 2 diabetes, but unfortunately it has progressed to renal failure for me. i have been on dialysis for a year now. is your blood sugar under control? if it is high a lot of the time that might be the cause of your constant bladder troubles. the first step is to get that taken care of. as far as your kidney troubles, be aware of the signs and symptoms of kidney disease. have your doctor check your urine regularly for protein, an early sign of kidney disease. he may also prescribe you an ACE inhibitor which can slow down the progression of kidney disease in diabetics. contact your local welfare office for help with your financial situation. if unfortunately you do develop kidney problems and are put on dialysis, you will be eligible for medicare after 3-4 months, which pays about 80% of your dialysis costs.you may also be eligible for grants and other financial aid, help is out there, you just have to look for it.don't be discouraged! hope this helps you out!

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          • #6
            I was eligible for Medicare as soon as I started dialysis....
            Shannon
            KidneyFun // Kidney Korner // Organ donation awareness products!
            If the world didn't suck...........We'd all fall off!

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            • #7
              I think your case is special, Shay. The rule is a 90 day waiting period before dialysis is covered by Medicare. However, Medicaid and grants will pay before then if there is no insurance and little assets. If a person is under retirement age, has few assets, and no insurance, the best place to start is the local financial assistance office.
              To the stars through difficulty!

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              • #8
                Thanks for listening!

                Thanks for those replies again. My blood sugar is getting under much better control now, and I am not seeing so many readings above 200 anymore the way I was all the time.

                I am having my BUN tested along with Creatnine levels to make sure I am still filtering okay. My doctor says that if those numbers are too much off, I'll need to see a neph doctor. So let's see what happens. I know this problem is nothing to play around with and I've had troubles for so long here.

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                • #9
                  Glad to hear that you have got your sugar levels under better control. However, 200 is still awfully high. Maybe your dr. can adjust your medications some more so that you can keep it steadily in the 100 range. If you can't get your blood sugar down and keep it from gyrating there will be kidney problems.
                  To the stars through difficulty!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It is challenging.....

                    You are absolutely right about keeping these sugars as close to normal as possible. My doctor likes for me to aim under 130. In other words anywhere from 70-129 is good for him.
                    He is trying to control my diabetes aggressively as possible.

                    The nurse practitioner was also speaking of keeping me on a low dose of antibiotics to stop having these urinary tract infections. I was placed on Urex a long time ago as my infections were resistant to all antibiotics for a while there. But unfortunately, the drug became unavailable. In fact I had a urologist threaten me with shots at that time as well.

                    I'm just anxious to see how my BUN and creatnine tests come out.

                    Thanks to those of you for your support here. I like to get an insight as to what others experience with renal problems.

                    More later-

                    Jennifer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Uti

                      People with diabetes have a higher risk of a UTI (Urinary Tract Infections) because of changes in the immune system. Any other disorder that suppresses the immune system raises the risk of a urinary infection. Antibiotics are used to treat UTI but over time, the body AND the bacteria builds up a resistance thru strain mutation and natural evolution. To help counter this resistance, a doctor may try different varieties of antibiotics for awhile until the bacteria becomes resistant to that partiular one; and then the cycle of antibiotic change is once again initiated. My brother is diabetic and over time, his body has become nearly totally resistant to antibiotic use. It has become a struggle for him and his doctor to find an antibiotic that is more successful in fighting UTI and other infections now.
                      UTI's are the most common type of infection in the human body. Women are more likely to contract a UTI over men. Normally, urine is sterile; meaning no bacteria, virui or fungi will be present to initiate infection on its own. Most often, an infection occurs when tiny organisms, usually bacteria from the digestive tract, cling to the opening of the urethra and begin to multiply. Microorganisms called Chlamydia and Mycoplasma may also cause UTIs in both men and women, but these infections tend to remain limited to the urethra and reproductive system. Unlike E. coli, Chlamydia and Mycoplasma may be sexually transmitted, and infections require treatment of both partners.
                      With this information, you should be able to make a self-diagnosis of the root cause(s) of your UTI's. If your partner is experiencing them too, then its either Chlamydia or Mycoplasma. If your partner is not experiencing them, then its more likely the E. coli bacteria variety.

                      |_arry

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                      • #12
                        Normal BUN but abnormal Creatnine-go figure!

                        Well, I found out my result today on my kidney numbers. My bun looks good at 10, but my creatnine according to the GFR calculator shows stage 2 CKD. Does anyone have that situation here? I'd like to hear those responses on that.

                        How long does this CKD take to progress anyhow, and can I stop it? I probably sound ignorant, but I am really not as knowledgable as those of you on here who have been all through this.

                        Jennifer

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                        • #13
                          Hi there; I also have a normal BUN (a 6) and stage 2 CKD. I don't have the diabetes though. I am new at this whole CKD, but wanted you to know you are not alone. If you find anything out about a diet for stage 2 please pass it on, I will do the same. There is also a lot of information on diets to follow on this website, and in the forums. As for the progression of CKD, I believe it is different for each individual. I am sure some one with more knowledge than me can answer that question.

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                          • #14
                            Glad to hear someone is like I am....

                            Thanks galfriday for answering my question. I'm going to start watching what I eat more and if I can get any advice, I'll pass it on.

                            Jennifer

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                            • #15
                              I am glad to hear, Jennifer, that you are only in Stage 2. That is an early stage and much can be done to slow the progress of kidney disease. Many people take years to go from one stage to another. I don't know how long I was in Stage 2 & 3 because I was well into Stage 4 before anyone picked up on my kidney disease. I stayed in Stage 4 for over 3 years. Others have had different experiences, and the outlook for people with diabetes is different than that for non-diabetics. The main rules are to learn as much as you can, to reduce sodium in the diet, and to do whatever is necessary to maintain your health with respect to managing things like weight, diabetes, and high blood pressure. I may have referred you to this site before, but if not you will find www.kidneyschool.org to be a very helpful site for all kinds of information on kidney disease, its treatment, and the renal diet.
                              To the stars through difficulty!

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