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Lowering the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease for People with Chronic Kidney Disease

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  • Lowering the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease for People with Chronic Kidney Disease

    http://www.dpcclassroom.org/#

    Lowering Your Risk:

    •Practice healthy eating habits. A kidney friendly diet is also heart healthy. Talk to your dietitian for more information about foods that are high in lean protein and low in phosphorus, fat, salt and sugars. Find out how much fluid you should drink every day and stick to it.

    • If your kidneys have are not functioning properly, it is very important to limit phosphorus in your foods. Many foods contain phosphorus so talk to your dietitian about menu ideas.

    •Certain medicines may be prescribed by your doctor called phosphate binders. Take these with food to help “bind” excess phosphorus from your foods. Examples of phosphate binders include Renvela®, Fosrenol®, and PhosLo®.

    •Vitamin D hormone replacements such as Hectorol®, Zemplar® and Rocaltrol® may be prescribed to decrease PTH and provide vitamin D to help your body absorb calcium into the bones.

    •Blood pressure medicine will most likely be prescribed by your doctor to protect both your kidneys and heart.

    •Controlling conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol will help to protect your kidneys and hear.

    •Work with your doctor and dietitian to keep blood glucose and blood pressure controlled to decrease the risk of blood vessel and heart damage.

    •Talk to your doctor and dietitian about diet and medicines to keep cholesterol and triglyceride levels within normal limits to prevent plaque buildup.

    •Don’t forget to ask about what kinds of exercise you can safely enjoy. Even mild like walking can help to lower blood pressure.
    I received the GIFT OF LIFE on Nov 9, 2010 thanks to my wonderful donor Laura and her family!

  • #2
    Re: Lowering the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease for People with Chronic Kidney Diseas

    Originally posted by Marina View Post
    http://www.dpcclassroom.org/#

    Lowering Your Risk:

    •Practice healthy eating habits. A kidney friendly diet is also heart healthy. Talk to your dietitian for more information about foods that are high in lean protein and low in phosphorus, fat, salt and sugars. Find out how much fluid you should drink every day and stick to it.

    • If your kidneys have are not functioning properly, it is very important to limit phosphorus in your foods. Many foods contain phosphorus so talk to your dietitian about menu ideas.

    •Certain medicines may be prescribed by your doctor called phosphate binders. Take these with food to help “bind” excess phosphorus from your foods. Examples of phosphate binders include Renvela®, Fosrenol®, and PhosLo®.

    •Vitamin D hormone replacements such as Hectorol®, Zemplar® and Rocaltrol® may be prescribed to decrease PTH and provide vitamin D to help your body absorb calcium into the bones.

    •Blood pressure medicine will most likely be prescribed by your doctor to protect both your kidneys and heart.

    •Controlling conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol will help to protect your kidneys and hear.

    •Work with your doctor and dietitian to keep blood glucose and blood pressure controlled to decrease the risk of blood vessel and heart damage.

    •Talk to your doctor and dietitian about diet and medicines to keep cholesterol and triglyceride levels within normal limits to prevent plaque buildup.

    •Don’t forget to ask about what kinds of exercise you can safely enjoy. Even mild like walking can help to lower blood pressure.
    Marina,

    One other item that can be controlled which is often overlooked for those on dialysis is"


    • Run at a blower blood flow speed on dialysis. High blood flows puts extra stress on your heart and other vessels.

    This can be controlled by simply lowering the blood flow on your cycler. ( reason most nephrologists do not prescribe a lower blood flow is in order to reach the CMS guidelines on your clearance. Slower, longer dialysis is not as harsh on your heart and vessels in the body. Dialyzors need to speak up for themselves and demand better treatments.
    ______________________________
    PD - 13 Years
    3 Transplants
    In-Center Hemo - 6 Months
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    • #3
      Re: Lowering the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease for People with Chronic Kidney Diseas

      Originally posted by M3Riddler View Post
      Marina,

      One other item that can be controlled which is often overlooked for those on dialysis is"


      • Run at a blower blood flow speed on dialysis. High blood flows puts extra stress on your heart and other vessels.

      This can be controlled by simply lowering the blood flow on your cycler. ( reason most nephrologists do not prescribe a lower blood flow is in order to reach the CMS guidelines on your clearance. Slower, longer dialysis is not as harsh on your heart and vessels in the body. Dialyzors need to speak up for themselves and demand better treatments.
      Great point M3Riddler!!!
      The high volumes of fluid removed causes B/P to crash, causing more damage.
      I received the GIFT OF LIFE on Nov 9, 2010 thanks to my wonderful donor Laura and her family!

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