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    Going on dialysis for the first time is a cofusing, scary time for anyone. I began dialysis on September 7th 1988 and remain on hemo dialysis to this day. I was 33 that day but will soon turn 55. I went through a wide range of emotions during those very difficult first few weeks and months of adjusting not only to having a life threatning illness but the lose of income from not being able to work, the feeling I had no control over my life and what was happening to me. Thne there is the diet of all diets. To top it off my wife of 11 years could not handle this and left me the first weekof my dialysis. She left me and our 11 year old daughter. I had no family in Tyler, Texas to turn to. My wife was the only one bringing in money at the time so I was being hit in every direction and I had to face it alone and try to raise our dauhgter without a mom. Now it is 2009 I have many years experence in dealing with kidney dialysis and all the complications that can occur. I have had heart attacks, mild strokes and many infections with this Polycystic Kidney disease (PKD).
    I did not realize that my just being there at the clinic was an inspiration to others who were just starting out on dialysis. They would hear of me and want to talk to me about it. So I began to stop in at the unit on my off days and greet other patients. I would hand them a piece of gum and tell them "hey I know what they are going through." I would then tell them my story of survival and this gave them hope. I found I could be useful to someone and it felt good to be able to set and listen to them and try to encurage them. I have had my share of bad times on dialysis but have always come through them. Trying to maintain a positive attitude can be hard at times. I lost a borther, sister and dad to kidney failure during my 21 years on dialysis, except dad died when I was 7. My faith in God helped me also. I know many eyes are on me at dialysis so I try to set a good example by dieting and staying upbeat even when I am not feeling like it.

  • #2
    Re: helping new patients

    Garyholt, what a wonderful attitude you have. Yes, I can see you could be an influential person to the newbies in the centers!

    A wise person once told me (my mom) that the best cure for depression was to help someone else. Sounds like that is just what you have found!

    Looking forward to seeing more of your posts!
    "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...
    It's about learning to dance in the rain. "

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    • #3
      Re: helping new patients

      garyholt - thank you for your post. You age going to be an inspiration to many people. How has your life changed in the past 22 years? (good and bad) Were you able to work again? How do you feel now? Right now I am stage 4, pre-dialysis and I am scared to death of ever having to possibly go on dialysis or even to get a transplant. I too sometimes feel like my life is over and that I no longer have control over it. That is not a good feeling. What about the diet, how did you or have you managed that?

      Your daughter is lucky to have you and I'm sure you feel the same way about her.

      May God bless you.
      ~ddarling~

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      • #4
        Re: helping new patients

        Thank you so much for your inspiring post, GaryHolt. I too would love to know more about how you came through this ordeal, especially not working and having a young daughter to take care of? (I have been on dialysis now for 18 months...I didn't think I'd get through it either...)

        Take good care and thank you for sharing this with all of us here.

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        • #5
          Re: helping new patients

          Originally posted by garyholt View Post
          Going on dialysis for the first time is a cofusing, scary time for anyone. I began dialysis on September 7th 1988 and remain on hemo dialysis to this day. I was 33 that day but will soon turn 55. I went through a wide range of emotions during those very difficult first few weeks and months of adjusting not only to having a life threatning illness but the lose of income from not being able to work, the feeling I had no control over my life and what was happening to me. Thne there is the diet of all diets. To top it off my wife of 11 years could not handle this and left me the first weekof my dialysis. She left me and our 11 year old daughter. I had no family in Tyler, Texas to turn to. My wife was the only one bringing in money at the time so I was being hit in every direction and I had to face it alone and try to raise our dauhgter without a mom. Now it is 2009 I have many years experence in dealing with kidney dialysis and all the complications that can occur. I have had heart attacks, mild strokes and many infections with this Polycystic Kidney disease (PKD).
          I did not realize that my just being there at the clinic was an inspiration to others who were just starting out on dialysis. They would hear of me and want to talk to me about it. So I began to stop in at the unit on my off days and greet other patients. I would hand them a piece of gum and tell them "hey I know what they are going through." I would then tell them my story of survival and this gave them hope. I found I could be useful to someone and it felt good to be able to set and listen to them and try to encurage them. I have had my share of bad times on dialysis but have always come through them. Trying to maintain a positive attitude can be hard at times. I lost a borther, sister and dad to kidney failure during my 21 years on dialysis, except dad died when I was 7. My faith in God helped me also. I know many eyes are on me at dialysis so I try to set a good example by dieting and staying upbeat even when I am not feeling like it.
          Hello garyholt, I read your post, and it was very touching and inspirational, as I haven't been living on dialysis as long as you have, I have had my share of grafts and repairs, two minor strokes, congestive heart failure, and thyroid gland removal surgery, I have had so many surgeries to my graft, that I had to transition to peritoneal dialysis, and this form of treatment has its ups and downs, mainly because of what PD does to my renal diet, I lose an excessive amount of protein and potassium, so I have to resort to taking protein and potassium supplements, but anyway, I had a ten year run with hemodialysis, and now in my 10th year of peritoneal dialysis, However, I did receive the blessing of a cadaver back in 1993, but it failed after four months of normal function, I was told that my immune system was too strong for the anti-rejection meds. I did decide to self-publish a book earlier this year to share my experience and knowledge with family members and others out there who are faced wth a life of future dialysis. I even searched in the beginning for a book of this magnitude, but couldn't locate one. I felt that having been on dialysis for almost two decades, I have learned a great deal through the years, the ups and downs associated with life on dialysis, I just wanted to give others an insight on what to expect in this life and that they can live a long productive life on dialysis.. Here is a summary of my book and the details on why I decided to finally take my memoirs and knowledge and put it in a book. Check it out online at www.xlibris.com, just click on the bookstore and search midway right sidebar - My Renal Life - by Gloria Ann Jeff-Moore, you can read a brief description, along with an excerpt and my author bio at your leisure. Also, I commend you on going through this and also raising your daughter, we sort of have the same thing in common. I was a single mom, raising my daughter alone for about ten years, until her father decided he would finally marry me after two divorces. She is currently in her junior year of college in the Pre-med program, she wants to be a surgeon, and to do vascular surgery, to place catherer and accesses in dialysis patients, she for some reason became fascinated with it, after witnessing all the endurances that I went through with Grafts and repairs.

          MY RENAL LIFE
          ( i know it, i live it)
          by
          Gloria Ann Jeff-Moore

          Living with dialysis treatments proved to be a serious challenge for me. Almost two decades ago, I developed the end stage renal disease, which left me no choice but to accept dialysis as a part of my life. Despite the hassles, I managed to adjust and keep living with a sense of hope. In my pursuit to share with readers and renal patients my story, I self-published through Xlibris Publishing the book My Renal Life (i know it, i live it). In the pages of my book, the text focuses on three important views - my copings with the inherited polycystic kidney disease and dialysis, the renal diet, and ways to prepare renal friendly meals. The education section of this book will help the readers grasp an understanding of what foods can benefit or be harmful to the renal diet, which itself can be quite a complex diet to follow. And as a bonus, I share an array of renal friendly recipes, that are quite easy to prepare, also I include some nutritional facts to help in accomodating a renal diet needs. I look forward to hearing from you, and anyone else on this thread that have PKD., that may have concerns about the uncertainities that they have to face with a life of dialysis.


          Glo

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          • #6
            Re: helping new patients

            Originally posted by garyholt View Post
            Going on dialysis for the first time is a cofusing, scary time for anyone. I began dialysis on September 7th 1988 and remain on hemo dialysis to this day. I was 33 that day but will soon turn 55. I went through a wide range of emotions during those very difficult first few weeks and months of adjusting not only to having a life threatning illness but the lose of income from not being able to work, the feeling I had no control over my life and what was happening to me. Thne there is the diet of all diets. To top it off my wife of 11 years could not handle this and left me the first weekof my dialysis. She left me and our 11 year old daughter. I had no family in Tyler, Texas to turn to. My wife was the only one bringing in money at the time so I was being hit in every direction and I had to face it alone and try to raise our dauhgter without a mom. Now it is 2009 I have many years experence in dealing with kidney dialysis and all the complications that can occur. I have had heart attacks, mild strokes and many infections with this Polycystic Kidney disease (PKD).
            I did not realize that my just being there at the clinic was an inspiration to others who were just starting out on dialysis. They would hear of me and want to talk to me about it. So I began to stop in at the unit on my off days and greet other patients. I would hand them a piece of gum and tell them "hey I know what they are going through." I would then tell them my story of survival and this gave them hope. I found I could be useful to someone and it felt good to be able to set and listen to them and try to encurage them. I have had my share of bad times on dialysis but have always come through them. Trying to maintain a positive attitude can be hard at times. I lost a borther, sister and dad to kidney failure during my 21 years on dialysis, except dad died when I was 7. My faith in God helped me also. I know many eyes are on me at dialysis so I try to set a good example by dieting and staying upbeat even when I am not feeling like it.
            Your post has really helped me this morning. I believe God led me to your post for that very reason. I have been grieving the last three days because I have lost the ability to produce more than a mere dribble. I feel as if I have lost something precious. I've been on dialysis since February, 2010 and every other person in my center can produce urine and I never dreamed I would loose the ablility since most of them have been on dialysis for years. I need to know more about what this means in my self care. But I'm searching for that information. That is how I found you. God has been very close to me during this. I'm not worried about it because I know it is in His Wonderful Hands. God Bless you, my friend. May His blessings cover you and give you strength in your calling to be an inspiration to others. You are obeying what He wants you to do with your life. That's nothing but GOOD!

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            • #7
              Re: helping new patients

              Gary, I want to grow up to be just like you!! ) You're a year older than me, so I can say "grow up," right? My Dad had the same attitude as you, and I pray I can continue the legacy of being a blessing to others no matter my circumstances. Like you, Dad had PKD. So far that gene has not been activated in me, but somehow I "earned" CKD diagnosis. Didn't even know what CKD was until a year ago. Well, let's go and make someone smile!! Thanks for sharing your heart.
              Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease, 17% renal function, 11 years
              *Non diabetic *Non dialysis
              High Blood Pressure, controlled


              "Never be afraid to trust an unknown future to a known God."
              ~Corrie ten Boom

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