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Vegetarian Cookbook for Kidney Disease

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  • Vegetarian Cookbook for Kidney Disease

    Does anyone know of a good Vegetarian Cookbook for Kidney Disease? I recently was told I have to change my diet and my husband and I belong to a cooking group in which I'm afraid I won't be able to participate. Wondering if there are any recipes that have been adapted from other cultures. We make a lot of unusual foods and I have been having difficulty trying to figure out how to make them. Plus, I come from an all Italian family and not being able to eat tomatoes and cheese is really difficult. Especially since every Sunday my entire family gets together for a spaghetti dinner.

    Anyone have any ideas beside the recipes on Davita?

  • #2
    Re: Vegetarian Cookbook for Kidney Disease

    Hi,
    the only other cultures that might have healthier stuff is Vietnamese food as they use rice noodles and broth for a lot of their cooking.

    You can still eat tomatoes and cheese-just not tons of them.
    You should probably look up the values for foods because every fruit and vegetables has potassium in it-even apples and grapes,which are almost as high as tomatoes or close to it.

    so,you could just eat a very small portion of tomato sauce. I don't know the measurements but I do eat some tomato and cheese,just not much and not veyr often.

    Some cheese like soft cheeses are lower than hard cheese.
    So you could have more of the softer cheese or just a tiny bit of parmesan.

    Also sauces with butter and oil,but not dairy are ok.
    I don't have any recipies as i usually make my own sauces.

    I guess I could right a cookbook as I am a pretty good cook and do not eat much meat myself.

    Grilled vegetables are nice with some oil,garlic and black pepper.

    Tofu is actually not that high in bad stuff when I recenty looked.
    I had stopped eating tofu partly because of that,but the plain blocks that are cheap here seem ok.

    Rice is usually ok as long as you add no salt.

    You'll pretty much have to invent your own recipies I guess.

    Plain white rice is also ok, but I just tried some unkle bens rice and no wonder s ome people hate rice, it sucks,even plain.

    Try some indian basmati rice or even jasmine rice,it smells nice and is very different.
    Also japanese use different rice and their rice is more sticky and even plain it is good.

    But also the "fancy" rice from other countries can get kinda expensive unless you buy a large bag. Asian stores are usually cheaper for that or else the section of the grocery store that has giant bags of rice in fabric from other countries.

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    • #3
      Re: Vegetarian Cookbook for Kidney Disease

      Remillard - Check the web, or even try to go on Amazon.com and see if they have any kidney cookbooks that are vegetarian.
      I have heard it is a little tricky trying to do a vegetarian diet while having CKD, but you might want to ask your renal dietician. I know you would have to be very careful with beans. And you would think that you could just eat lots and lots of vegetables and fruits, cheese, etc. but there again since we have to watch our potassium and phosphorus amounts it gets tricky. I absolutely hate the diet. I think it is just so unhealthy, even though I try to stay on it. I too am italian and I really miss all those fabulours pasta dishes!! My pasta now only consists of spaghetti or linguini with olive oil and garlic. Gone are the days of stuffed shells, spaghetti and meatballs with marinara sauce, lasanga, baked zitti, homemade macaroni and cheese, etc. Our holidays used to consist of a 6 or 7 course meal, and I'm not kidding. My mom was a great cook. Me, not so much.
      ~ddarling~

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      • #4
        Re: Vegetarian Cookbook for Kidney Disease

        Though pricey, I believe this book would be great for those who are pre-dialysis. Wish I could get it.

        Apples to Zucchini: A Collection of Favorite
        Low Protein Recipes (2005)
        by Virginia Schuett and Dorothy Corry

        found at: http://www.myspecialdiet.com/Shop/Detail.aspx?p=117

        A vegetarian diet would probably be more difficult after starting dialysis when protein requirements are greater.
        My Writings

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        • #5
          Re: Vegetarian Cookbook for Kidney Disease

          Thanks so much for everyone responding to my post! I am actually a good cook but find that this diet is so tricky. Everything that I'm not fond of I can eat, i.e. white bread, white rice (I prefer brown), etc.

          I also get a lot of inspiration from people who have already made recipes for special diets. I used to have to be on a high fat diet which wasn't easy for me because I have always been fond of healthy foods and have never had craving for fatty foods or chips, soda, etc. My downfall is chocolate, cheese, and tomatoes.

          I realize that I can eat these foods in moderation but unfortunately I have less self control around these foods and know I would cheat horribly if I even had a little so I try to avoid them. At least I know my weakness.

          Thanks again for the responses! I really appreciate it!!!

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          • #6
            Re: Vegetarian Cookbook for Kidney Disease

            Uh,
            there is more than 2 kinds of rice.
            You do NOT have to eat plain white rice.

            Buy rice from other countries and even plain, it is different tasting and not bad for you.

            Jasmine scented rice is very popular and nice tasting.
            Ok, it's not cheap for rice but smells and tastes great.
            Asian restaurants sell it plain around here for $3 a small bowl.

            or Try Basmati rice from india, it is white rice but different from north american rice.

            Also,if you make stuffed pasta you can always put something else to stuff it- does not have to be cheese.
            You should just try something else and think of stuff you can eat.

            Also go look up the nutrient values for foods and you will see that dieticians really make a lot of mistakes.
            Regular white bread is actually really bad for you too. The sliced ones are all preserved with phosphates, so are commercial english muffins,bagels,wonder bread ect....
            So the cheap brown bread is really no worse.

            I usually buy preservative free bread and frozen it is $1 a loaf so pretty cheap.

            Anyway about 50% of the info from the kidney foundation is incorrect.
            The people working there have not looked at the numbers for foods and are just going by what the dieticians there tell then,while they have not looked at numbers and go by what they are told.

            But if you actually look up the numbers for foods, some cheeses are ok. Some nuts are ok too, and apples and grapes are actually high in potassium even though I was told they are not.

            mango and pineapple are much lower, as is watermellon.
            and there is a chocolate bar you can eat see my other post.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Vegetarian Cookbook for Kidney Disease

              Thank so much,

              My other diet I used to be is so different than this one that I just have to get used to researching. Since this is the beginning for me, I find that I learn from other people who are experiencing similar issues.

              Thanks for reminding of the various types of rice. In fact, I checked my pantry and I have 7 different kinds of rice in my pantry. I guess I am stuck with the words of my nutrionist telling me to eat grapes and apples and not broccoli and eat white bread (which I am not fond of) I am eating preservative free rice and grain bread that I found in the frozen section. It's fairly good. Another member on this site sent me a document with mg and information regarding potassium and phosphorus levels.

              This should help me get started.

              Thanks again for all of your support. I appreciate very much!

              Have a great week!

              Amy

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              • #8
                Re: Vegetarian Cookbook for Kidney Disease

                Hi Cassie,
                It's been a couple of months since I have seen any posts from you. Are you OK? Hope to see your name on a post soon, you have given me lots of help from day 1. Please let me know.

                Consider yourself hugged, Simindalin

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                • #9
                  Re: Vegetarian Cookbook for Kidney Disease

                  Hello,

                  I am new to all this.. but, I must say that I have tried Basmati.. it is pricey.. but, it is better then the other rices... I think.. Jasmine is also good..

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                  • #10
                    My husband has stage 4 polycystic. No dialysis. Frustrated we turned to a holistic Dr a friend recommended, who also has a kidney disease and has been doing great for 7 years now. All due to our holistic Dr. My husband's diet is gluten free for one. Normal kidneys have a hard time processing gluten, most people consume an extreme amount due to the fact it is hidden in almost everything. Just think of it as 'glue'. WATER, WATER 3-4 qts a day! Brown basmati rice, no dairy, grass fed beef in small quantities-3-4 oz occasionally. Almond milk is awesome and we would not switch back to regular if we could. Coconut oil is a staple along with canned coconut milk used in recipes such as white chili. It's very good and does not make everything taste like coconut. Smoothies are a must! We freeze about 10 single serving bags, ready to blend, at a time. Greens, fruit, almonds, walnuts, chia seeds, liquid coconut oil are the main ingredients we use. I am new to this site and looking forward to it with hopes of cooking ideas! Cooking is not at all what it used to be. Following the diet our holistic Dr has recommended has kept my husband off dialysis. And gave us 'hope'. Our renal doctor only instructed him to drink water, watch salt intake, and have blood drawn every 3 months 'until dialysis'. What a downer!

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